Skip to content

The poppy

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

Most people realize the origin of the poppy as a symbol for Remembrance Day as being from the poem In Flanders Fields that was written by a Canadian veteran, John McCrae, but do they really realize the symbolism today? About two weeks before Remembrance Day people all over this country begin wearing the poppy. Wreathes are placed in business store windows and every working person looks forward to getting the day off. But, is that all there is? Did you know that the selling of poppies and wreathes help to raise funds that are necessary for the Legion to operate the Service Bureaus which are advocates for veterans and ex-service people as well as their dependents. See 'Poppy' P.# Con't from P.# They are seeking compensation from the government for injuries that occurred during their service to their country Ð whether it be during wartime or in peace keeping. Approximately a million plus dollars is raised every year as a direct result of the Poppy Campaign. Such examples of the use of the Poppy Fund is for food, accommodations, utilities, clothing, educational assistance, household needs, as well as medical, dental and optical needs. It should be noted that the beneficiaries of aid from the Legion's Poppy Fund are not just limited to Veterans and ex-service personnel. Throughout the years financial assistance has been given to many charities as well as providing for the aged and disabled. This includes such things as meals-on-wheels, medical assistance, supplying medical equipment, transportation and other necessities. As well there is a disaster relief fund set up for members and non-members alike, whenever the need arises. Anyone who works on the Poppy Campaign is a volunteer so there is very little administrative costs other than the manufacturing of the actual poppy and wreaths. The money is kept in a trust fund and all spending must be authorized as stated in the by-laws of the Royal Canadian Legion. The regular working costs of each individual branch are covered by the dues paid by the membership. As Sheila Adams, the Poppy Chairwoman stated: "Each November, millions of poppies have blossomed on the jackets, dresses and hats of nearly half of the Canadian population. The poppy is the symbol that individuals use to show that they remember those who were killed in the wars and in peace keeping operations that Canada has been involved in." The poppy is The Flower Of Remembrance.