Skip to content

Saskatchewan election too close to call

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

Creighton Mayor Bruce Fidler makes no secret of the fact that he supports Saskatchewan Premier Lorne Calvert in his re-election bid. "I've always been an NDP member and always will be," said Fidler, who was acclaimed to the mayor's seat last week. Fidler favours the NDP over the Opposition Saskatchewan Party because he feels the governing party "has always been the supporter of the labour movement." The mayor is on one side of a politically-divided province, as the outcome of the provincial election on November 5 appears to be very much up in the air. A new public opinion poll shows that 44.7 per cent of respondents plan to vote for the governing NDP, while 42.1 per cent prefer the opposition Saskatchewan Party. That's a slim difference of 2.6 per cent Ñ the exact margin of error, 19 times out of 20, for the survey. Saskatchewan Party Leader Elwin Hermanson dismissed the poll as inaccurate, pointing out that the party's own polling suggests it has a 10-point lead on the governing NDP. "We're sure it's wrong," he told The Canadian Press. Premier Lorne Calvert wasn't about to get excited over the survey. "I never put much stock in one poll," he said in an interview with The Canadian Press. "I think what is important in polling is the trend and I think clearly the trend would show that momentum is coming to the New Democrats." Sigma Analytics conducted the poll, published in the Saskatoon StarPhoenix on Saturday. The survey showed the Liberal Party in third place among Saskatchewan voters with support from 12.2 per cent of respondents. The remaining one per cent of respondents indicated that they would vote for a candidate not affiliated with any of the three major parties. The governing NDP currently holds 28 seats, just two more than its Opposition, who have 26. There are four independent seats.