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It's a matter of opinion

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting. Issues aren't born controversial.

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

Issues aren't born controversial. They become that way when large groups of people come out both for and against them. By that definition, the potential high school program in Creighton certainly fits the bill. The release of that often discussed report affirming the feasibility of the new high school has had a polarizing effect among people on both sides of the border. Those who have made up their minds either really like the concept or really resent it. It seems that for every seemingly valid argument brought forth by one side, the other has an equally potent rebuttal. A common justification against the idea is that our communities have been shrinking for years and that this is no time to start duplicating services. In response, supporters state that Creighton needs to do what's best for Creighton; if adding the grades makes economic and practical sense, it should be done. To those who insist the quality of education for Creighton students would suffer, others point to the pallet of nearly 80 courses set to be taught in the school, including high level offerings such as chemistry and biology. People who say that Creighton and Flin Flon teenagers won't form friendships are told of the many sociable opportunities in our communities, such as Bomber games, sports and youth programs like cadets. Then there are proponents who simply disdain having to bus their young people across the border for a basic education, to whom opponents suggest that Flin Flon, Creighton and Denare Beach are, when all's said and done, a single community. There are perhaps dozens of other examples, which only serve as additional shovels full of coal on this fiery debate. People who are undecided want to know which side is right and which side is wrong. Like any contentious issue, the answer is impossible to ascertain from an objective point of view. The truth of the matter is, it's all a matter of opinion. On this particular matter, it is the beliefs of Creighton parents and taxpayers, and their elected education officials, that count. The Creighton School Board has been handed the weighty task of making a decision that will Ñ for better or worse, depending to whom you listen Ñ change the face of education in their community. There may not always be much that opponents and proponents of the potential high school agree on, but it's crucial that both sides be heard and that the pros and cons of each argument be carefully weighed.