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Hydrogen talks

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

Energy, Science and Technology Minister Tim Sale was in Washington, D.C., yesterday to attend talks on the development of the hydrogen industry and help further the province's leadership role in the development of the industry. "Manitoba's commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the development of hydrogen fuel, as well as its reputation as a key centre for manufacturing, make us an excellent location for this industry," said Sale. "We have already taken a leadership role in this sector by releasing our provincial hydrogen strategy, and being part of global discussions is an important part of that plan." Sale is attending the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy conference where representatives from government from across the globe, industry representatives and non-governmental organizations are meeting to discuss the future of hydrogen development. "This meeting is an excellent opportunity to pursue new strategic partnerships and share ideas while learning about where other jurisdictions and companies are going in regard to hydrogen," said Sale. Sale noted that Manitoba was the first province in Canada to release a detailed hydrogen strategy. The report was released by Manitoba's Hydrogen Steering Committee, a broad-based group of stakeholders with direct interest or involvement in hydrogen development including all three levels of government, utility, academic and industry representatives. It recommended that Manitoba pursue options for the development of hydrogen as the "ultimate fuel of the future". As part of this effort, the province is pursuing: transportation and hydrogen production/refuelling initiatives including the hydrogen fuel cell transit bus project, announced in December 2002; a stationary fuel cell demonstration project to be powered by unused by-product hydrogen from industrial production processes; the establishment of a Hydrogen Research Centre of Excellence to be based at the AECL Whiteshell laboratories in Pinawa and the co-ordination of the growing interest and involvement in hydrogen at Manitoba universities and colleges; a commercial electrolysis unit at the Manitoba Hydro Dorsey converter station to produce industrial grade hydrogen to be used as a specialized coolant; and a memorandum of understanding with the Government of Iceland on hydrogen development. Sale said that Manitoba continues to work to make progress on the report's recommendations including the continued partnership with the federal government, New Flyer and various private sector partners on the development of the $8 million hydrogen fuel cell bus project. In addition, Sale noted that Manitoba recently signed an historic transatlantic memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Iceland to pursue a partnership for hydrogen development. The agreement identifies five areas for potential research, development and production. While in Washington, the minister will meet with Icelandic officials to discuss the first joint project to come under the MOU. As well, he will be meeting with companies interested in partnering with Manitoba on the province's various hydrogen initiatives. "Manitoba and Iceland already share cultural and business resources and both have a common interest in developing this clean fuel," said Sale. "Greater partnerships help us work for common initiatives that are important for North America and Europe." "Hydrogen development has a global focus and advances in technologies cannot be done in isolation." It's for this reason we are seeking partnerships with key jurisdictions and companies in Canada and throughout the world."