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Fire restrictions eased for areas surrounding Flin Flon, some backcountry travel approved

Fire and backcountry travel restrictions have been eased again for areas around Flin Flon, Cranberry Portage, Snow Lake and elsewhere.
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Fire and backcountry travel restrictions have been eased again for areas around Flin Flon, Cranberry Portage, Snow Lake and elsewhere.

Areas 12 (which covers Cranberry Portage, Clearwater Lake, most of Grass River Provincial Park and stretches to Wabowden) and 13 (which covers Flin Flon, Snow Lake, Pukatawagan and stretches to Thompson) are now under Level 1 restrictions, starting July 29. Both areas were under Level 2 restrictions before the change.

Under the new rules, provincial burning permits are still cancelled and campfires are still allowed from 8 p.m.-8 a.m. One big change regards what the province calls "motorized backcountry travel" - the downgrade in fire danger means people will be able to run ATVs and similar vehicles through backcountry, but not from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. unless operators have provincial travel permits.

Boats no longer need to be launched or landed at developed shortlines only and the ban on camping in backcountry areas has been lifted - campers do not only have to camp in developed campgrounds. Restrictions applying specifically to outfitters or operators have also been lifted.

Cabin owners can access their properties and all wayside parks in both areas are open.

Fireworks remain banned in all Manitoba provincial parks.

A municipal fire ban is still in effect for the City of Flin Flon as of July 29, as well as in the Town of Snow Lake. Similar bans were lifted for Creighton and Denare Beach earlier this week, with a Saskatchewan-wide fire ban lifted last week.

One Manitoba area - Area 4, located near Manitoba's elbow with the Ontario border - is under Level 4 restrictions, with all access to and from the area banned, no fires permitted and all permanent residents told to be ready to evacuate on an hour's advance notice.