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Back pain

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

Canadians tend to 'tough it out' when it comes to back pain instead of taking action to fix it says The Canadian Chiropractic Association (The CCA) which has launched a national public education campaign to motivate Canadians to stop holding back when it comes to back pain. According to a national public survey, more than two-thirds of the adult population or 22 million Canadians will experience back pain annually. Yet 14 per cent report they do nothing for their pain, the most frequent reason being they "thought it would go away." Another 37 percent report relying on over-the-counter pain relievers to alleviate symptoms. "Canadians are avoiding dealing with their back pain, and that's alarming," says Dr. Greg Stewart, president of The CCA. "Back pain can be debilitating and seriously affect people's ability to function in their daily lives Ð at home, at work and at leisure. It has an emotional cost, a physical cost and an economic cost. And it's largely preventable." To address the issue, The CCA is launching a national public awareness campaign under the theme, "What's Holding You Back?' Canadians can take two quizzes to find out if they are back pain avoiders and to assess their risk for developing back pain. Canadians can take the test on-line at www.ccachiro.org to find out how they score and to learn if they have back healthy habits or if they are setting themselves up for back problems. "Anyone who experiences back pain for more than three to four days or who has recurrent or chronic back pain shouldn't be toughing it out," says Stewart. "Ignoring back pain can set you up for lifelong problems. Consult a health professional and develop a plan for both treatment and prevention." The CCA advises that a multi-disciplinary action plan with active patient involvement yields the best results. "Despite popular belief, resting in bed is not recommended for back pain unless it is so severe that you cannot sit or stand," says Stewart.