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AIDS Awareness Week

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

The Reminder is making its archives back to 2003 available on our website. Please note that, due to technical limitations, archive articles are presented without the usual formatting.

HIV/AIDS (acquired immune deficiency disease) is not becoming less prevalent, it is rapidly increasing. And the sad fact is that, especially in young people, STDs (sexually transmitted diseases) are still increasing which is a sure way of telling that young people are not using proper protection and are playing 'Russian Roulette' when they have unprotected sex! This is not a scare tactic, this is fact! Again, people must be reminded that when you have sex with a person, you are virtually having sex with every person that that partner has been intimate with. Think about it! If it doesn't gross you out it should! Sex is an activity that can come with huge responsibilities. It is an adult decision and definitely not child's play. During the upcoming AIDS Awareness Week, from November 24 to December 1, health care workers will take the opportunity to focus the public's attention on this important subject. It is hoped that the public's understanding of the work being done in this health area, and why it is important, will be highlighted. Also, that people will be encouraged to do their part to end the stigma and discrimination against people with HIV/AIDS. See 'Projects' P.# Con't from P.# During this week, hundreds of community based HIV/AIDS projects and programs in each province and region will become visible to the public through events and activities that give local context to the realities of HIV/AIDS in Canada and the world. Community based organizations will be: raising people's awareness about HIV/AIDS; informing people about the stigma (still) and discrimination and how they themselves fuel the epidemic; challenging people to examine their own beliefs about HIV and AIDS; helping people to figure out what they can do to stop the stigma and discrimination. making people aware of the work and achievements that have been made in each community letting people in health-related and other professionals realize the role and influence they have on other people's attitudes in terms of HIV/AIDS and discrimination. teaching people to become advocates and to support those living with HIV/AIDS and to create support free from stigma and discrimination. get people in the legal, social and political fields more involved to address HIV/AIDS increase the demand for more HIV/AIDS related services and most important educate people on the prevention of HIV/AIDS. If you are interested in this program or if you need more information, you can call Brad McDougall at the CNRC office at 687-1340. or go online at www.aidssida.cpha.ca.